Mix and Mash

How might we help colleagues in teacher-powered schools measure each other’s impact on peer and student learning?

How might we help colleagues in teacher-powered schools measure each other’s impact on peer and student learning?

That’s the original question we started thinking about several weeks ago with Lori, our #teacherpowered guru.  In a Zoom meeting last week, we had a great discussion about how design thinking is messy.  It’s difficult to move forward without opening your mind to some of the diverse possibilities that extend beyond the obvious. That happens in the empathy phase and in the definitition phase.  Today, I learned it could happen during the ideation phase as well.
That happened to me today with some of my students.  We’ve been working on a project to help raise money for wells in Africa for quite a while and it culminates in a water walk.  My students have worked very hard to develop empathy for other students across the world as a result of this experience.  Their idea was to create a water olympics team event to go along with this walk so people had options.  We’ve even scheduled an after-school camp for 2-5 grade students next week to get a taste of the entire project, and they were to preview their events.
Today, though, everything was thrown off because of another event scheduled and beyond their control.  This event is going on at the same time  as the water project.  Using the same design thinking processes as we’ve used all semester, I turned the problem over to them.  Here’s a sample of the free-form thinking that resulted and continued all day long.
The discuss has elements of frustration (Panic and then RAGE QUIT), giving kids voice and choice (this is YOUR project and I want to make sure YOU make a decision), multiple suggestions, complete with free-flow spelling (not the point in the brainstorming phase), a willingness to suggest multiple ideas, and an idea I never though about (helping others raise money by mashing together the two events in a way that I had never thought about).
And now, after 12 hours of elapsed time, these 10 year olds considered multiple options, interacted, and came to a decision –without me playing the autocratic teacher card.  That is the power of the design thinking model. If ten  year olds can do this with 8 weeks of practice, just imagine what our schools can do with teacherpreneurs and other stakeholders working together!
==Now It’s Your Turn==
Back to the original question, then, which seems to need a reframing through a mashup. You can click on the padlet below to join in.
The impact of political campaigning is whether or not we buy-in and elect someone.  Students are impacted when they learn new skills and show proficiency in assessment.  The impact of teacherpowered structures is to shift the practices of teachers through shared leadership. Hmmm….
Mashup Question:  What do leadership, buy-in for ideas, and assessment have in common?  How will that help us learn from one another.

I’d love to hear what you have to share.