High-Stakes, Not Hostage

I survived Testober.  My first October as a high school Testing Coordinator was spent eyeballs deep in spreadsheets of students and their schedule data.  It was challenging enough to coordinate the movement – and test security – of several hundred students, displace teachers and their untested students so I could have their rooms, and find places every class period to put all the bodies. Now it seems as though our state and district want to up the ante by adding technological challenges as we move to high-stakes testing online.

Before we go all in, there are some things that teachers need. 

I survived Testober.

My first October as a high school Testing Coordinator was spent eyeballs deep in spreadsheets of students and their schedule data.  It was challenging enough to coordinate the movement – and test security – of several hundred students, displace teachers and their untested students so I could have their rooms, and find places every class period to put all the bodies. Now it seems as though our state and district want to up the ante by adding technological challenges as we move to high-stakes testing online.

Before we go all in, there are some things that teachers need. 

I present to you a digital flyer outlining these needs.

I shared this with my Administrator so he knew precisely why I had concerns for our students and staff.  He could refer to it when making his case with district level policymakers.  It could also be shared during public comment time at a School Board meeting, or with other lawmakers who seem to have power over what and how we test our students.

Regardless of how it’s shared, the concerns are real and need to be said.

We need to have a real game plan before we implement online testing.  Here’s what we need so we don’t feel held hostage by mandates.