Skip to main content

Join the Community

or Close

Search

CTQ Blogs

CTQ bloggers write about transforming teaching. Share their posts and chime in!

Featured

The future leadership of teachers

1 comment

Almost 30 years ago, Judith Warren Little, one of our nation’s most prominent scholars, offered a clarion call for teachers to lead school reform, not just be the targets of it. Since then teachers, slowly but surely, are beginning to serve in more expansive roles without leaving the classroom. In a piece originally published by TeachingPartners, Vicki Phillips and I cite examples of teachers leading in bold ways to explore the future of leadership of teachers.

Featured

The courage to leap

4 comments

Many teachers find themselves faced with the decision to leap into the unknown and confront fear, hope, self-knowledge, and, ultimately, commitment to the profession that teachers make at crucial times in their careers. In this post, I share the stories of four teacher leaders—Jessica Cuthbertson, Jessica Keigan, Megan Allen, and Lori Nazareno—who chose to make that leap.

Featured

Risks and rewards: Moving past the single story

5 comments

One powerful statement during a parent-teacher conference revealed the dangers of single stories. The moments that followed illustrate the importance of listening, sharing stories, and seeking to understand one another in building strong relationships with families.

Latest Blog Posts

Bill Ferriter

May 26, 2007

Top ten changes to NCLB....

0 comments

In the first of a string of posts highlighting the work of our nation's Teachers of the Year, here is the complete list of ten recommendations recently submitted to Congress for consideration during the reauthorization debate surrounding No Child Left Behind:

10 Changes to NCLB from the Teachers of the Year

1) Fully fund all education and assessment programs that are federally mandated.

Continue Reading…

Renee Moore

May 23, 2007

Ready or not?

0 comments

People at every level of education like to blame those at the earlier levels for not adequately preparing students. It’s become a standing joke: university professors deride their colleagues at the community college; undergraduate instructors berate high school teachers; high school faculty rip their middle school counterparts; who, in turn, badmouth the elementary school staff; who shake their fingers at the preschool; who throw up hands in exasperation about the parents.This blame game, however, is not amusing; it is dangerously divisive and a major distraction.

Continue Reading…

Bill Ferriter

May 22, 2007

Announcing the Second Annual "K12 Online" Conference...

0 comments

Announcing the second annual "K12 Online" conference for teachers, administrators and educators around the world interested in the use of Web 2.0 tools in classrooms and professional practice! This year's conference is scheduled to be held over two weeks, October 15-19 and October 22-26 of 2007, and will include a preconference keynote during the week of October 8. This years conference theme is "Playing with Boundaries." A call for proposals is below.

Continue Reading…

JohnNorton

May 21, 2007

TLN on the hill

0 comments

TLN members Renee Moore and Bill Ferriter will share their thoughts about teaching quality in high priority schools during a congressional briefing today, sponsored by the Center for Teacher Quality. The hour-long session (2-3 p.m – 2261 Rayburn HOB) will be moderated by Sharon Robinson, president, American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education and will also included remarks by Linda Darling-Hammond, Charles E.

Continue Reading…

JohnNorton

May 20, 2007

Teacher stickiness

0 comments

A new Education Week story by Bess Keller raises questions about the now-conventional wisdom that up to half of all new teachers leave the profession within the first five years. Or is it 40 percent? (as leading researcher Richard Ingersoll still contends). Or is it closer to 33 percent? (as leading policy maven Linda Darling Hammond still contends). Keller points to several recent studies in California and Illinois that suggest the figure may be somewhere in the 20-30 percent range.

Continue Reading…

Renee Moore

May 17, 2007

Better than an apple

0 comments

Within the Teacher Leader Network, one of the discussions we have had is about the portrayal of teachers in movies and other media.  The popular myth is that great teachers are rare, and awful or mediocre teachers are the norm.

On this Teacher Appreciation Day, however, I would argue that great teachers are not as rare as it might seem—they’re just harnessed.

Ask any adult and you will get the name of at least one great teacher.

Continue Reading…

Subscribe to Blogs

Stay Informed

Sign up to receive the latest news and events through email!

Sign Up