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The future leadership of teachers

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Almost 30 years ago, Judith Warren Little, one of our nation’s most prominent scholars, offered a clarion call for teachers to lead school reform, not just be the targets of it. Since then teachers, slowly but surely, are beginning to serve in more expansive roles without leaving the classroom. In a piece originally published by TeachingPartners, Vicki Phillips and I cite examples of teachers leading in bold ways to explore the future of leadership of teachers.

Featured

The courage to leap

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Many teachers find themselves faced with the decision to leap into the unknown and confront fear, hope, self-knowledge, and, ultimately, commitment to the profession that teachers make at crucial times in their careers. In this post, I share the stories of four teacher leaders—Jessica Cuthbertson, Jessica Keigan, Megan Allen, and Lori Nazareno—who chose to make that leap.

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Risks and rewards: Moving past the single story

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One powerful statement during a parent-teacher conference revealed the dangers of single stories. The moments that followed illustrate the importance of listening, sharing stories, and seeking to understand one another in building strong relationships with families.

Latest Blog Posts

Bill Ferriter

June 7, 2007

Johnny Doolittle heads to Capitol Hill…

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A few weeks back, I had the opportunity to speak—at the invitation of the Center for Teaching Quality and the National Education Association—to an audience of educational policymakers in DC on Capitol Hill. The topic of the briefing was the challenges of recruiting and retaining teachers in high needs schools.

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Bill Ferriter

June 5, 2007

Redefining the classroom. . .

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One of the things that I like the best about the Radical is the thoughts that you share with me through my comments section. Inevitably, my own thinking is shaped by your words. A good example is this well-received advice left on my Standing at the Edge of the Classroom post by a reader named Rod who recommends that I redefine my idea of "classrooms" as I continue to grow as an educator:

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Bill Ferriter

May 30, 2007

NCLB recommendation 1: Full funding

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Jake---in comment that he left on my recent post about recommendations made by the National TOY team on revisions to NCLB---noted that the original list wasn't terribly specific. He reminded me that I hadn't started my strand sharing the rationale provided by the National TOYs for each of their ten recommendations! I figured today would be a great day to start….so here's the rationale written by the TOY team for recommendation 1:

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Bill Ferriter

May 30, 2007

Our nation's burden?

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On my recent post regarding the top 10 changes to NCLB recommended by our National Teacher of the Year team, I wrote:

I've been mentally wrestling with an interesting question since seeing this list a few weeks back: If we could only guarantee that one of these critical changes would be adopted, which one would you argue in favor of?

Mike--one of my regular readers--pushed my thinking into an entirely new direction when he wrote:

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Bill Ferriter

May 26, 2007

Top ten changes to NCLB....

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In the first of a string of posts highlighting the work of our nation's Teachers of the Year, here is the complete list of ten recommendations recently submitted to Congress for consideration during the reauthorization debate surrounding No Child Left Behind:

10 Changes to NCLB from the Teachers of the Year

1) Fully fund all education and assessment programs that are federally mandated.

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Renee Moore

May 23, 2007

Ready or not?

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People at every level of education like to blame those at the earlier levels for not adequately preparing students. It’s become a standing joke: university professors deride their colleagues at the community college; undergraduate instructors berate high school teachers; high school faculty rip their middle school counterparts; who, in turn, badmouth the elementary school staff; who shake their fingers at the preschool; who throw up hands in exasperation about the parents.This blame game, however, is not amusing; it is dangerously divisive and a major distraction.

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