A free summer read — Thinking skills NOW

We love Educational Leadership’s summer Online-Only edition. The material is always good. And all the articles are publicly available at no cost! Just click and read.

This summer’s edition has the theme Thinking Skills NOW — a hot topic among many teacher leaders, school teams, and school reform wonks.

Among the articles that caught our eye:

Immersed in Inquiry
by Jean Anne Clyde and Angela Hicks
Read how fifth graders become researchers as they ponder, “How has our county changed?” Then view their photo story to find out what they learned about investigative reporting.

Preparing Creative and Critical Thinkers
by Donald J. Treffinger
A toolbox from the Center for Creative Learning students shows students how to synthesize, analyze, brainstorm, plan, and prioritize. Click through the toolbox for an in-depth example of each technique.

Asking Good Questions
Kenneth E. Vogler
By recording each other’s questioning techniques, teachers improved their ability to ask a whole range of cognitively challenging questions. Use their observation chart to assess your own questioning skills.

Developing the Language of Thinking
Jeff Zwiers
Classroom tactics to help English language learners-and their classmates-understand academic vocabulary and concepts.

The Promise of Career/Tech
Scott J. Peters
Why career/technical education fulfills needs for the future.

This last article brings to mind a recent, important report from the Southern Regional Education Board’s High Schools That Work program. Making Career/Technical Studies an Essential Part of High School Reform offers a strong argument for a much more integrated curriculum that blends academic and hands-on learning, drawing on the strengths of both content expertise and highly engaging pedagogy.

If you’d like to engage in some discussion of the new Educational Leadership issue, visit the ASCD Inservice blog andcomment on the question/prompt: Is thinking well the most important 21st century skill we should teach? And can teachers “teach” students to think?

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